Why Build, Measure, Learn – isn’t just throwing things against the wall to see if they work


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Steve Blank

I am always surprised when critics complain that the Lean Startup’s Build, Measure, Learn approach is nothing more than “throwing incomplete products out of the building to see if they work.”

Unfortunately the Build, Measure, Learn diagram is the cause of that confusion. At first glance it seems like a fire-ready-aim process.

It’s time to update Build, Measure, Learn to what we now know is the best way to build Lean startups.

Here’s how.


Build, Measure, Learn sounds pretty simple. Build a product, get it into the real world, measure customers’ reactions and behaviors, learn from this, and use what you’ve learned to build something better. Repeat, learning whether to iterate, pivot or restart until you have something that customers love. build measure learn

Waterfall Development
While it sounds simple, the Build Measure Learn approach to product development is a radical improvement over the traditional Waterfall model used throughout the 20th century to build…

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9 Great Books to Take Your Startup to Success


A few very interesting books have been published lately about Agile philosophy and Lean manufacturing applied to startups, and more in general books related to improving the chances of success in starting a company.

I suggest the following ones, together with some classics:

Which other great books do you think are missing?